ACURA ViewPoint: David C. Speedie: ‘There They Go Again’: The Chicken Hawks Take Flight At The Financial Times

An editorial in the January 9 Financial Times, “No reward for Putin’s aggression over Ukraine” evokes Ronald Reagan’s memorable and damaging words in a Presidential debate with Jimmy Carter: “There you go again” — in this case, with just one more opinion piece on the Ukraine situation that is one-sidedly incomplete.

MK Bhadrakumar: Putin draws the line for colour revolutions

The failed attempt by the Biden administration at regime change in a strategically located remote country sandwiched between Russia and China (which is manifold more strategic than Ukraine ever can be) exposes American diplomacy to ridicule in a vast region of Inner Asia. And it forecloses any best-laid plans by NATO to cross the Caspian ever.

This Wednesday: The Quincy Institute and ACURA: U.S-Russia Relations: Can ‘Strategic Empathy’ Be A Way Forward?

On January 19, from 12 – 1pm ET a panel co-sponsored by the Quincy Institute and ACURA will explore how the Biden team might scale back the escalatory approach and replace it with some simple strategic empathy. Joining us will be Gov. Jerry Brown, author and columnist Robert Wright, and Professor Nicolai Petro. Katrina vanden Heuvel will moderate. Register here:

U.S.-Russia Relations: Can ‘Strategic Empathy’ Be A Way Forward?

 

 

ACURA’s Anatol Lieven: Did this week’s US-NATO-Russia meetings push us closer to war?

A new war looks increasingly possible.

This war would be a disaster for all parties concerned: for NATO, whose military impotence would be cruelly emphasised; for Russia, that would suffer severe economic damage and be forced into a position of dependency on China with grave implications for Russia’s future; and above all for the thousands of Ukrainian soldiers and civilians who would lose their lives.

From the Archives: Stephen F. Cohen: Have 20 Years of NATO Expansion Made Anyone Safer? (Oct. 2017)

Professor Cohen noted that 20 years ago, in 1997, President Bill Clinton made the decision to expand NATO eastward. That same year, in order to placate post-Soviet Russia, then weak and heralded in Washington as America’s “strategic friend and partner,” the Russian-NATO Founding Act was adopted. It promised that expansion would entail no “permanent stationing of substantial combat forces.” Cohen took the occasion of the anniversary year (2017) to ask whether NATO’s eastward expansion has created more insecurity than provide the security it promised.

Lawrence Korb: How Russia Views the Ukraine Crisis

Russians appear to believe that we are not respecting them in the way a great power deserves. Several political scientists actually mocked Francis Fukuyama for declaring the end of history after the collapse of the Soviet Union, and instead cited the work of Stephen Cohen.

Next Week: Panel Discussion: Quincy Institute and ACURA: U.S-Russia Relations: Can ‘Strategic Empathy’ Be A Way Forward?

On Wednesday, January 19, from 12 – 1pm ET a panel co-sponsored by the Quincy Institute and ACURA will explore how the Biden team might scale back the escalatory approach and replace it with some simple strategic empathy. Joining us will be Gov. Jerry Brown, author and columnist Robert Wright, and Professor Nicolai PetroKatrina vanden Heuvel will moderate.

site by iKnow